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Category: Credits

What are the qualifications for the adoption credit?

You may be able to take this credit in 2013 if any of the following statements are true:

1. You paid qualified adoption expenses in connection with the adoption of an eligible U.S. child in:

a. 2012 and the adoption was not final at the end of 2012, or

b. 2013 and the adoption became final in or before 2013.

2. You adopted a child with special needs and the adoption became final in 2013. (In this case, you may be able to take the credit even if you did not pay any qualified adoption expenses.)

3. You paid qualified adoption expenses in connection with the adoption of an eligible foreign child in:

a. 2013 or prior years and the adoption became final in 2013, or

b. 2013 and the adoption became final before 2013. For more information, please review Form 8839 for line 1, column (e).

4. You have a carryforward of an adoption credit from 2012.

Qualified Adoption Expenses include:

  • Adoption Fees
  • Attorney Fees
  • Court Costs
  • Travel Expenses (including meals and lodging) while away from home, and
  • Re-adoption expenses relating to the adoption of a foreign child

Qualified Adoption Expenses do not include expenses:

  • For which you received funds under any state, local, or federal program,
  • That violate state or federal law,
  • For carrying out a surrogate parenting arrangement,
  • For the adoption of your spouse's child,
  • Paid or reimbursed by your employer or any other person or organization, or
  • Allowed as a credit or deduction under any other provision of federal income tax law.


For expenses paid prior to the year the adoption becomes final, the adoption credit is generally allowed for the year following the year of payment. For expenses paid in and after the year the adoption becomes final, the credit is allowed in the year of payment. If a taxpayer pays qualified expenses for an adoption in the current year and prior years and the adoption becomes final in the current year, the taxpayer may be eligible to claim the credit on the return for the current year for the expenses paid in the current year as well as for any expenses paid for that adoption in the prior years.

For both the credit and the exclusion, qualified expenses include reasonable and necessary adoption fees, court costs, attorney fees, traveling expenses (including amounts spent for meals and lodging while away from home), and other expenses that are directly related to and the principal purpose of which is the legal adoption of an eligible child. An eligible child must be under 18 years old, or be physically or mentally incapable of caring for himself or herself. You may not claim an adoption credit or exclusion for a child who is not a United States citizen or resident unless the adoption becomes final. In the case of an adoption of a special-needs child, you may be eligible for a certain amount of credit or exclusion regardless of actual expenses paid or incurred. A child has special-needs if all of the following conditions are met:

1. The child is a United States citizen or resident

2. A state determines that the child cannot or should not be returned to his or her parent's home, and

3. A state determines that the child probably will not be adopted unless assistance is provided

 

The credit and exclusion for qualified adoption expenses are each subject to a dollar limitation and an income limitation. The amount of your adoption credit or exclusion is limited to a specific dollar amount ($12,970 for tax year 2013) for each effort to adopt an eligible child. If you can claim both a credit and an exclusion, this dollar amount applies separately to each. For example, if in 2013 you paid $10,000 in qualified adoption expenses for a final adoption, and your employer paid $4,000 of additional qualified adoption expenses, you may be able to claim both a credit of up to $10,000 and an exclusion of up to $4,000 in employer-provided adoption assistance. The dollar limit for a particular year must be reduced by the amount of qualified expenses taken into account in previous years for the same adoption effort.

The income limit on the adoption credit or exclusion is based on your modified adjusted gross income (MAGI). If your MAGI is below the beginning phase out amount ($1194,580 for tax year 2013), the income limit will not affect your credit or exclusion. If your MAGI is more than the beginning phase out amount your credit or exclusion will be reduced. If your MAGI is above the maximum phase out amount ($234,580 for tax year 2013), your credit or exclusion will be eliminated.

Generally, if you are married, you must file a joint return to claim the adoption credit or exclusion. If your filing status is married filing separately, you can claim the credit or exclusion only if you meet special requirements.

You may be able to claim a refundable tax credit for qualified expenses paid to adopt an eligible child (including a child with special needs). Apart from the credit, you may be able to exclude from your gross income amounts paid to you, or for you by your employer, for qualified adoption expenses under a qualified adoption assistance program. You can claim both the exclusion and the credit for expenses of adopting an eligible child. However, you cannot claim both a credit and exclusion for the same expenses.

NOTE: For tax years prior to 2010 and in the current 2013 tax year, the adoption credit is not refundable. For tax years 2011 and 2012, this credit was refundable.

For more information, refer to the instructions for Form 8839.